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QUANSETT NURSERIES, INC.

HERBS

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Image Soon Aloe (Aloe barbadensis)

Aloe comes from tropical Africa. Related species are used as an antidote for arrow poison, and we value the plant for its healing effect on burns, wounds and insect bites.

Aloe is a succulent, which has a fibrous root system producing long, tapering, stemless leaves. These light green leaves have spiky margins and are blotched with cream. The firm upright stems bear several bell-shaped, fleshy, yellow-orange flowers.

  • Medicinal:Sap from the leaf creates a soothing skin cream. Also used in shampoo for an itchy scalp, and add to suntan lotion for a cooling effect. You may directly add sap to a minor burn for relief.
  • Full sun to light shade
  • 12-24" tall
  • Maintain at a 41 degree minimum
  • Tender Perennial
  • Gritty and Well-Drained soil
Image Soon Angelica (Angelica archangelica)

This highly aromatic biennial is praised for it's thought to "cure all ills". Thought to come into bloom around the time of Archangel Michael's birthday. Adds a tropical appearance to the garden.

  • Culinary: Seeds may be used to flavor drinks, including gin, vermouth, and chartreuse. Leaves are chopped and mixed with mint and mayonnaise.
  • Aromatic: Seeds are burnt to perfume a room. Leaves are used in potpourri. Roots can be cut do produce a gum to also be used in potpourri.
  • Medicinal: Leaves may be used (dried or fresh) to produce a tea as a tonic for colds, and to reduce flatulence. Fresh leaves can be crushed to calm travel sickness and to perfume your car.
  • Light shade
  • 3-8 feet tall
  • Grows in moist, damp locations.
  • Biennial
  • Deep and moist soil.
Image Soon Arugula (Eruca sativa)

An easy growing salad herb with a rich, pungent flavor. Small creamy-yellow flowers in late spring to early summer. Grows wildly in and around wastelands.

  • Full sun to light shade
  • 2-3 feet tall
  • Annual
  • Rich, moist soil
  • Culinary:Leaves create a spicy flavor to a green salad. The earlier they are picked, the milder the flavor shall be.They may also be added to sauces, or steamed as vegetables.
  • Medicinal: Leaves are taken for stomach upsets.
Image Soon Aztec Herb (Lippia dulcis)

A tropical vining plant that is commonly used as a groundcover.Almost allways in color with white flowers. Makes a great hanging basket. Also contains a sweetener 1,000 times sweeter than sucrose.

  • Culinary:Leaves have an extract used as a sweetener.
  • Medicinal:Aztecs used for coughs, asthma, and bronchitis.
  • Full sun
  • 8 inches in height
  • Tender perennial
Image Soon Balm of Gilead (Cedronella canariensis)

A choice herb with a strong musky scent to its dried foliage. Good in potpourris. A deciduous shrub with pink flowers clusters from late summer to early autumn. it is an excellent houseplant with its long-lasting flowers.

  • Aromatic: Leaves are used in potpourri for their musky scent.
  • Full sun
  • 3-4 feet in height
  • Tender perennial
  • Well-drained, medium loam.
Image Soon Basil, African (Ocimum basilicum 'Kilimanjaro')

Striking purple-veined large leaved variety with light lavender flowers. The best basil for cool temperatures and short days.

  • Culinary: Dried foliage is used as an intruiging spice in cooking.
  • Aromatic: Foliage a a camphor scent to it.
  • Ornamental: Purple veins and lavender flowers make this one of the best looking basils out there.
  • Full sun
  • 2-3 feet in height
  • Protect from wind when young. Strengthens with age.
  • Tender perennial
  • Well-drained and moist soil
Basil, Aussie (Sweetie) Basil, Aussie (Sweetie)
Image Soon Basil, Cinnamon (Ocimum basilicum 'Cinnamon')

Basil was found around the tomb of christ, and therefore is used by the orthodox to prepare holy water and is set below the church altar.

  • Culinary: Used as a spice in most cooking these days. Especially in Asia, where the plant originated. Adds a nice cinnamon spice to your food. Flavor is essential to Asian and mid east cooking.
  • Aromatic: The leaf gives off a fragrant spicy smell. Possibly one of the finest and desired of basils.
  • Full sun
  • 24 inches in height
  • Seedlings are prone to damping off, so be carefull when watering at a young age. Protect from wind, and heavy rains. Keep from cold weather.
  • Annual
  • Well-drained and moist soil
Basil, Cuban
Image Soon Basil, Genovese (Ocimum basilicum 'Genovese')

Large leaf type from the Genoa area of Italy. Use in the same manner as Sweet Basil. Easily seperated from the other basils by the texture and color of the foliage.

  • Culinary: A fine addition to italian food. Used widely in Italy and neighboring countries. Goes great with tomatoes and pesto.
  • Aromatic:A delicious perfume scent to the foliage.
  • Full sun
  • 24 inches in height
  • Protect from damaging winds, and terrential rains. Keep from cold and frost.
  • Annual
  • Well-drained and moist soil
Image Soon Basil, Green Ruffle (Ocimum basilicum 'Crispum')

A larger leafed basil than the rest, with a lettuce-looking wrinkle to the foliage. Thought to be used in the past for witchcraft.

  • Culinary: The clove flavored leaves may be used to spice a wide range of foods. Chicken and fish amongst the best.
  • Aromatic: Wonderfull scent of emitted from the foliage.
  • Ornamental: A curl to the foliage makes it an attractive basil. Great in salads.
  • Full sun
  • 24 inches in height
  • Protect from damaging winds and rains.
  • Annual
  • Well-drained, moist soil.
Image Soon Basil, Holy (Ocimum basilicum sanctum)

Also known as "Sacred" basil, Larger than most basils, and may also be used medicinally.

  • Culinary:Being a larger basil, it's to be an unending source of leaves to be used for spices in a vast majority of foods.
  • Aromatic:Fills the air with a sweet, fruity scent. Leaves may also be dried, and will hold their fragrance for years to come.
  • Medicinal:Also used as a disinfectant towards malaria.
  • Full Sun
  • 30-36 inches in height
  • Protect from damaging winds and rains. give more space than most basils, due to its size.
  • Annual
  • Well-drained and moist soil.
Image Soon Basil, Lemon (Ocimum americanum)

With small leaves, white flowers and a lemon fragrance, this is a must have basil.It won the All-American in 1998, and is praised in some areas for it's medicinal uses.

  • Culinary: Used for a citrus tea flavoring, and a wonderful seasoning. Especiall good in vinegars and with seafood.
  • Aromatic: Has a delicious lemon fragrance that may be used in potpourris if desired.
  • Medicinal:Tea may calm nerves.
  • Full Sun
  • 20 inches in height
  • Protect from strong winds and rains. Also from cold temperatures.
  • Annual
  • A well-drained moist soil.
Image Soon Basil, Purple Ruffles (Ocimum basilicum 'Purple Ruffles')

An ornamentally attractive plant. Exellent use as a garnish for it's beautiful purple ruffled foliage. Wonderfull pink-lavender flowers.

  • Culinary: A good medium flavor to add to dishes of your favorite food.
  • Aromatic: Not as fragrant as some of the other basils, but still quite delightful.
  • Ornamental: Widely used as a garnish to beautify plates, and popular in the garden for it's beautiful foliage.
  • Full Sun
  • 18 inches in height
  • Protect from wind, rain and cold.
  • Annual
  • Well-drained moist soil.
Image Soon Basil, Red Rubin (Ocimum basilicum 'Red Rubin')

A larger leaved variety with the 'darkest red' foliage. This basil hold it's own weight in fragrance to fill your garden with it's sweet smell.

  • Culinary: Widely added to vinegars and food for it's sweet taste.
  • Aromatic: A sweet basil fragrance to it's dark foliage.
  • Ornamental: It's foliage is a wonderfull contrast to and garden, with the added bonus of lavender flowers in mid to late summer. Also may be used as a garnish for your favorite dishes.
  • Full sun
  • 16-18 inches in height.
  • Protect from wind, rain, and cold.
  • Annual
  • Well-drained moist soil.
Image Soon Basil, Siam Queen (Ocimum basilicum 'Siam Queen')

Medium leaved with white flowers this delightful basil has many culinary uses. It has remarkably beautiful foliage, with a highlighted purple stem.

  • Culinary: Has a unique, pungeant basil flavor. Essential spice in Thai cooking.
  • Aromatic: A refreshing spiced flavor that will wake your senses. Simply mouth watering.
  • Full Sun
  • 18 inches in height
  • Protect from wind, rain and cold.
  • Annual
  • Well-drained moist soil.
Image Soon Basil, Spicy Globe (Ocimum basilicum 'Spicy Globe')

A sweet basil with a dwarf, compact habit and smaller leaves. Ideal as an edging plant or in a container herb garden.

  • Culinary: Adds a bit of a spice to your favorite food dishes. Especially useful in soups, and sauces.
  • Aromatic: Welcomes you with a spicy, basil scent.
  • Full Sun
  • 10-12 inches in height.
  • Protect from wind, heavy rains, and cold.
  • Annual
  • Well-drained moist soil.
Image Soon Basil, Sweet (Ocimum basilicum)

The old favorite. A bushy, green leaved variety known for it's original sweetness. Very popular in many types and forms of cooking.

  • Culinary: A sweet taste that is almost essential in pesto, and excellent with tomatoes. Sauces, and stews are another favorite for this old time herb.
  • Aromatic: The sweet smell delights the senses for an uplifting feeling. Gives the need to turn around and smell it again.
  • Full Sun
  • 20 inches in height.
  • Protect from wind, rain, and cold.
  • Annual
  • Well-drained moist soil.
Image Soon Bay, Sweet (Laurus nobilis)

Bay leaves are among the most versatile of herbs. If they are regularly trimmed, they also make decorative shrubs. The glossy, sweetly scented leaves are indispensable in the kitchen.

Bay leaves are oval, pointed, and about 3 inches long. Dark green and glossy. The stems are tough and woody and have a gray bark. The flowers, which appear in late spring at the base of the leaf stem, are small, yellow, and rather insignificant.

  • Culinary: Soak leaves in soups and stews, and other soft foods, but remove before serving. Leaves have a bitter taste to them. Boil in milk to flavor home made milk products.
  • Medicinal: Leaf is infused to stimulate the appetite. Extract oil to work into joints and bruises.
  • Aromatic: Both leaves and stem give off it's distinctive scent. Leaves are used in potpourri.
  • Ornamental: Plants are widely used for topiary.
  • Full Sun
  • Sweet Bay can grow to 25 feet in height, but the New England climate will stunt that to about 10 feet.
  • Protect from wind, and winter weather. Can make a good house plant when the temperature drops.
  • Tender, evergreen perennial.
  • Rich, moist, and well-drained soil
Image Soon Bedstraw (Yellow) (Galium verum)

Hence the name, the dried leaves of this plant smells of freshly mown hay. Once used to stuff mattresses. The roots and stems of this old fashioned plant produce a red dye, as the flowers produce a yellow.

  • Culinary: Concoctions curdle milk for the process of making cheese.
  • Medicinal: Used to be prescribed for bladder problems
  • Aromatic: Flowers give off a honey scent. Leaves and flowers are used in potpourri.
  • Ornamental: Clusters of yellow flowers all summer long.
  • Full sun to partial shade
  • 1-3 feet in height.
  • Divide the underground runners in spring or fall.
  • Hardy perennial
  • Well-drained manured lawn.
Image Soon Bergamot/Bee Balm (Monarda didyma)

White to pink flowers are spotted purple and attract bees and butterflies. Unique, sharply squared stems support attractive flowers to harbour butterflies, bees, and hummingbirds.

  • Culinary: Complex flowers may be scattered in salads. Leaves were enormously popular for a tea substituta after the Boston Tea Party. Leaves are also added to salads, and stuffings for a citrus flavor. Also the other ingredient to bergamot milk.
  • Medicinal: Tea is used to relieve flatulance, menstrual pain, insomnia, nausea. Also used for soar throat.
  • Aromatic: When plant is breaking the ground, the fresh, new foliage fills the air with a mouth-watering lemon scent. Foliage and flowers are added to potpourri.
  • Ornamental: Beautiful flowers top this plant with the attraction of gracefull insects and birds.
  • Full Sun to part shade.
  • 2-3 feet in height.
  • Add a mulch in the spring. Divide every 3 years.
  • Perennial.
  • Rich, light, and moist soil.
Image Soon Borage (Borago officinalis)

This plant is a native of northern Europe, and grows well in the temperate regions of North America. Said to make men and women happy. Also to give courage to. Flourished with beautiful flowers, which are said to be the backbone of floral designs today.

  • Culinary: Flowers may be sprinkled in salads for additional color. Young foliage added to drinks for their cooling effect. The taste of the foliage is very similar to that of a cucumber.
  • Medicinal: Foliage is rich in mineral salts, for those who are on a salt-free diet.
  • Ornamental: Sky blue flowers are crystalized to add to cake decorations. May also string flowers together to create a necklace.
  • Full Sun
  • 24 inches in height.
  • Annual
  • Light, dry, and well-drained soil.
Image Soon Bouncing Bet (Soapwort) (Saponaria officinalis)

Soapwort was grown in the 19th century for it's healing effects. Widely known for it's cleansing effect on fabrics, and it's addition to many soap products.

  • Culinary: Flowers may be used to garnish a salad. They are also sometimes used in brewing to produce a head on a beer.
  • Medicinal:Roots may be used against acne, and psoriasis. Also soothes poison ivy rashes.
  • Aromatic:Flowers have a lovely sweet scent to them.
  • Full sun to part shade.
  • 24-30 inches in height.
  • Use sticks to support stems. Do not plant near fish ponds. Roots will poison the water.
  • Perennial
  • Fertile and moist soil.
Image Soon Calamint, Variegated (Calamintha officinalis 'Variegata')

Bright pink flowers from mid summer to early autumn top this wonderfull variegated herb. A native to southern Europe.

  • Aromatic: Foliage gives off a delicious minty scent. Highly scented pink flowers as well.
  • Medicinal: Used in tea and syrups for coughs.
  • Ornamental: Bright pink flowers and randomly variegated foliage make this herb a sight for sore eyes.
  • Part Sun
  • 8-10 inches in height.
  • Space plants about 12 inches from each other to give them the room they need to grow. Keep from frost.
  • Tender Perennial
  • Well-Drained soil
Image Soon Calendula, Pacific Beauty (Calendula officinalis)

Also known as Pot Marigold, this long blooming, versatile herb is well known for many uses.Persians and Greeks used it's bright flowers for garnish, and Egyptians thought of it as a rejuvinating herb. Also used in the Civil War to treat open wounds.

  • Culinary: Flowers are widely used to give color to butter and omelettes. Also added to bread and milk products for the same purpose. Gives off a light tangy flavor. Also, sprinkle the petals in soups and stews.
  • Medicinal: Could be made into a mouthwash to help with tooth and gum issues.Oil is extracted from petals for aromatherapy, and said to be rejuvinating as well as healing. Infusions help alchoholics with bile production in the liver. soothes inflamations in all areas. A definite skin additive.
  • Ornamental: Bright orange and yellow edible flowers makes this herb a wonderful addition to the garden with a long blooming season. Dried flowers will add color to any potpourri.
  • Full Sun
  • 12-18 inches in height.
  • Dead-head past flowers to promote a longer blooming season.
  • Annual
  • Well-Drained soil. Avoid waterlogging.
Image Soon Capers (Capparis spinosa)

A Slow growing prickly bush. It bears large yellowish white flowers in the spring. Native to the mediterranean, it is world famous for the delicassy in which it provides.

  • Culinary: Flower buds are pickled in a vinegar to produce the "Caper". However, the plant gives harvest some resistance with it's annoying prickly nature.
  • Ornamental: Beautiful yellow-white flowers may top this plant in the early spring, if you so desire. You must pass the harvest of the "Caper" to enjoy the beauty of this flower.
  • Full Sun
  • 30-36 inches in height.
  • Native to warm temperatures, this herb must be kept from the cold.
  • Tender Perennial.
  • Well-Drained soil
Image Soon Caraway (Carum carvi)

An old time herb, which was used hugely through time. Egyptians, greeks, and romans enjoyed this as a high-end treat. Ancient beliefs say this herb to be high in power with the strength to frighten witches, and the potency to attract love.

  • Culinary: Seeds are widely used for many benifits. They may be added to a majority of meals for their unique taste, and may also be added to seed and nut dishes.Its oil is used in liquors. Roots may be boiled for a vegetable dish. Leaves are chopped into salads.
  • Medicinal: Chewing seeds aid in digestion, helps with flatulance, promotes good oral hygiene as well as a tooth ache soother. Seed's oil is also used in mouthwash, and cologne.
  • Full Sun
  • 2-3 feet in height
  • Pick seeds in late summer when the seed heads are brown. Dig up roots the second year.
  • Biennial
  • Rich Soil.
Image Soon Cardamom (Elettaria cardamomum)
Image Soon Carob (Ceratonia siliqua)
Image Soon Catmint (Nepeta mussini)
Image Soon Catnip (Nepeta cataria)

Catnip, renowned for the euphoria it causes in cats, also has a few human uses, both culinary and medicinal. It makes an attractive border plant if you don't mind frequent feline visitors. As colonies moved, the plants went with them. However, when they left to move again, some of the plants stayed behind.

  • Culinary: Catnip is grown to produce a tea, in which is declining in popularity. The foliage may also be added to salads for a sharp exotic flavor.
  • Medicinal: The tea has been used to treat everything from the common cold to the worst of cancers. Also commonly used as a sedative to help you as a sleeping aid.
  • Ornamental: Grown for it's grey-green foliage and white flowers with pink and purple spots.
  • NOTE: Catnip is a feline aphrodisiac. Most, not all cats enjoy the scent of this herb and only chew on it to release more of the scent.
  • Full Sun to part shade
  • 1-3 feet in height.
  • Gather he laeves and flowers in late summer when the plant is in full bloom.
  • Perennial.
  • Average Well-Drained soil
Image Soon Chamomile, Annual (Matricaria recutita)

This annual form of chamomile is also called German chamomile. Chamomile in greek means "ground apple". This form of chamomile is often mistaken, or confused with its brother, Roman Chamomile.

  • Medicinal: The oil derived from the flowers of the chamomile has three main uses. Anti-inflammatory for the skin and mucous membranes. Anti-spasmotics for digestion and menstrual cramps, and Anti-infectives for other minor ailments.
  • Aromatic: A slight apple fragrance to the foliage. Is frequently added to potpourris, and dried flower arrangements.
  • Full Sun
  • 2-3 feet in height.
  • When the petals of the flower begin to turn back, it is time to cultivate them for tea.
  • Annual.
  • Sandy, Well-Drained soil.
Image Soon Chamomile, Perennial (Chamaemelum nobile)

This perennial is also known as Roman chamomile. It is often used as a groundcover because of it's size and growing habit. Also stronger in fragrance than the German Chamomile.

  • Medicinal: The oil derived from the flowers of the chamomile has three main uses. Anti-inflammatory for the skin and mucous membranes. Anti-spasmotics for digestion and menstrual cramps, and Anti-infectives for other minor ailments.
  • Aromatic: A slight apple fragrance to the foliage. Is frequently added to potpourris, and dried flower arrangements.
  • Ornamental: Bieng a ground cover, it is used in walkways and paths. It is also grown for lawns, and may be cut at a high level to keep it trimmed and to also keep from flowering. This chamomile can withstand a moderate amount of foot traffic and gives off it's apple scent when stepped on.
  • Full Sun
  • 9 inches max in height.
  • When the petals of the flower begin to turn back, it is time to cultivate them for tea.
  • Perennial.
  • Light and dry soil.
Image Soon Chervil (Anthriscus cerefolium)

This herb is native to the Middle East, southern Russia, and the Caucasus, and was probably introduced to Europe by the Romans. It has become one of the classic herbs used in French cookery, in which it is considered indispensable.

  • Culinary: Widely used in almost all foods. Foliage may be added to salads, soups, sauces, and the majority of meat and poultry dishes. Stems are also used in the same manner.
  • Medicinal: Plant is high in vitamin C, carotene, and other minerals. A tea may be made to help in digestion and liver complaints.
  • Part Shade
  • 12-15 inches in height
  • Shade gives it more flavor. Sun will quickly bring it to seed.
  • Annual
  • Light, well-drained soil.
Chives (Allium schoenoprasum)

Native in to Europe and Asia, this famous herb was imported in the seventeenth century. At first not to have many uses, then later thought to have powers to repel witches.

  • Culinary:With the taste of sweet onion, this herb is hard to avoid. Available commercially, you can find them in almost any house. mixed in cream sauces, cheese products, and breads. An excellent compliment for almost any vegetable. Flowers also may be added to salad. They may also be added to vinegars for the taste or the look.
  • Medicinal: The natural secretion of sulphur oil proves this to be a relative of the onion.(The oil that makes you cry). The oil lowers the blood pressureChopped portions may be sprinkled on food to aid in digestion.
  • Ornamental: Overlooking it's culinary and medicinal values, chives is also grown just for its ornamental highlights. Long, slender, tube-like foliage topped with beautiful globes of mauve in June. Chives are also dried by many home growers for their addition to flower arrangements.
  • Full Sun
  • 12-24 inches in height.
  • Bring indoors during winter for a year long harvest.
  • Perennial
  • Rich, Well-Drained soil
Image Soon Chives, Garlic (Allium tuberosum)

This close relative to the chive is almost identical. The foliage is flat, and is a later bloomer than its brother. Popular in China.

  • Culinary: The foliage gives a blended taste of Garlic and Chives. Used in the same manner as Chives, but chosen for its garlic accent to foods.
  • Medicinal: The sulphur oil is also extracted from this plant, as it is from all of the Alliums. The oil is an antiseptic.
  • Ornamental: The star white flowers rising above the flat foliage of this plant adds interest to any garden in August and September.
  • Aromatic: Flowers are rose scented.
  • Full Sun
  • 18-24 inches in height.
  • Cut the flower stalk before it goes to seed. Extremely self seeding, and can spread rapidly.
  • Perennial.
  • Rich, Well-Drained soil.
Image Soon Cilantro/Coriander (Coriandrum sativum)

Known to emit the same scent as a bedbug, this herb is suprisingly used to scent some perfumes and cosmetics. Seeds of this plant were als ofound in the tombs of the ancient Egyptians. Showing how far back it has pleased mankind.

  • Culinary: Foliage has a sage flavor with a hint of citrus. The roots taste of the same matter, yet a bit nuttier. It is popular in Thai cooking, where it is minced and added to fresh salads.The seeds taste of straight citrus. All three of the roots, seeds, and foliage are great with a vast majority of foods.
  • Medicinal: The seeds are used in the aid of digestion and upset stomachs. The herb is also widely used just to cover the taste of other dreadful medicines.
  • Aromatic: The bedbug scent dissapears with age, and it eventually only holds the scent of citrus. Then may be added to potpourri.
  • Full Sun to partial shade
  • 2-3 feet in height.
  • Do not overfertilize. It will reduce the potency.
  • Annual
  • Rich, light, and Well-Drained soil.
Image Soon Comfrey (Symphytum officinale)

Once cultivated extensively for it's healing remedies, it has recently been thought of as a carcinogen. It was once prescribes for broken bones with the thought that it could bring them together. Also had been widely grown for the use of fodder for livestock.

  • Culinary: Although once eaten in stews and salads, continuous research proves Comfrey to have it's faults. This herb is no longer recomended for consumption.
  • Medicinal: An effective remedy for sores and bruises. It contains allantoin, which helps in tissue growth and the multiplication of cells. Blended leaves may be added to skin to produce cells and help soothe and soften. Boiling will erraticate the allantoin within the plant, so attempt to avoid the process.
  • Full Sun
  • 3-5 feet in height.
  • Allantoin is produced in the fastest growing part of the plant. In the winter it would be the roots, and in the spring it would be the new, young foliage.
  • Perennial
  • Rich, moist soil.
Coriander, Vietnamese (Polygonum odoratum)

This low-growing herb is quite popular in the Orient. Known for it's ornamental and culinary properties, it makes a very nice plant to spice up your garden or food.

  • Culinary: Leaves have a milder taste than Coriander, with an aftertaste of lemon and pepper. Foliage may be used raw, or cooked with fish, poultry, rice and vegetables. The older red leaves are too hot for the use of cooking.
  • Medicinal: Used in the relief of nausea. Also has anaphrodisiac properties.
  • Ornamental: Leaves are used as a garnish for fowl, and other dishes. Has a variegation to it's pointed leaf that gives it that oriental look.
  • Full sun
  • 8-12 inches in height.
  • Perennial
  • Well-drained soil
Image Soon Curry (Helichrysum angustifolium)

The initial attraction of this herb lies within it's evergreen leaves. Derived from Southern Europe, it is increasing in popularity in the area.

  • Culinary: Sprigs are used in soups, and rice dishes, but taken out before serving. Solely for flavoring.
  • Aromatic: The sweet scent of curry adds flavor to the air. The herb has a delicious scent that can practically make the mouth water.
  • Ornamental: The very attractive silver foliage always adds interest to a garden. This evegreen plant sprouts tiny yellow flower in the late summer which benifits even more to it's ornamental value.
  • Full Sun
  • 18 inches in height.
  • Hardy in temps higher than 22 degrees. Anything less must be winter protected. Makes a good window plant.
  • Tender Perennial. Evergreen.
  • Rich and Well-Drained soil.
Curry, Tiny Leaf (Helichrysum angustifolium nana)

The same as the curry, however, dwarfed in size. Same features and attractions do make this plant just as extraordinary.

  • Culinary: Sprigs are used in soups, and rice dishes, but taken out before serving. Solely for flavoring.
  • Aromatic: The sweet scent of curry adds flavor to the air. The herb has a delicious scent that can practically make the mouth water.
  • Ornamental: The very attractive silver foliage always adds interest to a garden. This evegreen plant sprouts tiny yellow flower in the late summer which benifits even more to it's ornamental value. Makes a great border plant.
  • Full Sun
  • 8 inches in height.
  • Hardy in temps higher than 22 degrees. Anything less must be winter protected. Makes a good window plant.
  • Tender Perennial. Evergreen.
  • Rich and Well-Drained soil.
Image Soon Dill, Bouquet (Anethum graveolens)

Was hugely popular in the Roman culture. Garlands topped the heads of the wars mightiest heroes, and had it's own territory in the Roman gardens. The blue-green foliage of the plant adds an attractive lace in the vegetable or herb garden.

  • Culinary: Feathery foliage is used freshly in salads. Russia uses it as a neccesity in all dishes. Goes great with almost any vegetable, soup, sauce, or spread. Seeds may be used whole or ground to add flavor as well.
  • Medicinal: Foliage and seeds are highly beneficial in the production of mothers milk. Both are also used in the aid of flatulence. Dill water can be made to cure hiccups and stomach cramps. Chew foliage to freshen your breath.
  • Full Sun
  • 36 inches in height.
  • Hang the plant over a cloth after the flower turns brown to collect seed.
  • Annual
  • Rich and Well-drained soil.
Image Soon Dill, Fernleaf (Anethum graveolens 'Fernleaf')

Same as the boquet dill, but dwarfed in size. The blue-green foliage is also transformed into more of a lacy looking plant. It is an excellent addition to a gardener who is limited on space.

  • Culinary: Feathery foliage is used freshly in salads. Russia uses it as a neccesity in all dishes. Goes great with almost any vegetable, soup, sauce, or spread. Seeds may be used whole or ground to add flavor as well.
  • Medicinal: Foliage and seeds are highly beneficial in the production of mothers milk. Both are also used in the aid of flatulence. Dill water can be made to cure hiccups and stomach cramps. Chew foliage to freshen your breath.
  • Full Sun
  • 18 inches in height.
  • Freeze leaves for preservation.
  • Annual
  • Rich and Well-drained soil.
Image Soon Dittany of Crete (Origanum dictamnus)

Native to the mountains of Greece and Crete. Old times say that the root, when eaten, would hasten childbirth. The smell was also thought to be strong enough to repel the greatest of beasts.

  • Aromatic: Foliage is used as an inscent.
  • Ornamental: thick grey-green foliage is covered in small, whit hairs. Pink flowers accent the plant in may.
Image Soon Echinacea (Echinacea angustifolia)

Echinacea was very popular amongst the Native Americans. As a matter of fact, in the 1920's, it was deemed the most popular plant drug in the country.

  • Medicinal: Native Americans discovered the roots to be of very high medicinal value. the roots contain a glucose which helps in the aid of wounds. You may find it in a large choice of drinks, and vitamins to this day.
  • Ornamental: More known for the beauty of the purple coneflower that it produces from mid to late summer.
  • Full Sun
  • 12-24 inches in height.
  • Every 4-5 years, it is a good idea to dig them up, divide them, and replant divisions in a newly fertilized soil.
  • Perennial
  • Fertile, well-drained soil.
Image Soon Elecampane (Inula helenium)

Being a highly fabled plant, it really is hard to tell where it's name derived from. Known throughout Rome as a cure for indigestion. Plant was also used in the study of veterinarians.

  • Culinary: Rootstock is candied and eaten as a sweet or the base of a flavoring for other sweets. Roots can also be cooked as a vegetable.
  • Medicinal:Roots used to help with indigestion. May also help with bronchitis.
  • Ornamental: A striking addition to many gardens with its sunflower looking flowers.
  • Sun to part shade.
  • 4-6 feet in height.
  • Dig up roots in second or third year if you will be using them for remedies.
  • Perennial.
  • Moist soil.
Image Soon Epazote (Chenopodium ambrosioides)

This native to tropical America is widely used in Mexican foods.

Image Soon Eucalyptus (Eucalyptus globlus)

The Aborigines found that the Eucalyptus tree stores water in its roots. When parched, one could dig up a root, and extract water. Many settlers died of thirst as they were surrounded by Eucalyptus trees.

  • Medicinal: Oil is derived from leaf, root, and bark that has a spicy cooling taste.You can use this oil as an anti-bacterial, but must be diluted with water or something of the sort. You may also inhale steam from the oil to relieve, asthma, and other lung related problems. The oil is used in rubs, lozenges.
  • Aromatic: The oil is used in air fresheners, deodorizers, and insect repellants. Dried foliage may be used in potpourris.
  • Ornamental: The foliage is known throughout for its use in dried arrangements.
  • Full Sun
  • Too much water makes the foliage blister.
  • Tender perennial
  • Light, loamy soil.
Image Soon Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare)

With its umbels of tiny yellow flowers and dark green or bronze wispy leaves, fennel is a decorative addition to the herbaceous border where it makes a good background plant. Be warned, however, that many other plants dislike fennel and grow poorly when forced to share space with this strong herb.

  • Culinary:Leaves are used in salads, and stems are eaten fresh like celery. The seeds are popular in baked desserts, such as bread, cookies, and cakes. The entire plant is safe for human consumption.
  • Medicinal: Fennel tea has said to soothe the stomach. Ancient physicians reccomended it for the inrease of mothers milk. Fennel has a huge history in greek and midievil times. Fennel was thought to be one of the 'Nine Sacred Herbs'. Also indicated to reduce the effects of alchohol.
  • Aromatic: The oil extracted from fennel is sweet in aroma. Used in perfumes, liquor, and soap.
  • Ornamental: Fine feathery foliage makes this a very attractive plant.
  • Full Sun
  • 7 feet in height
  • Coriander will stop Fennel from forming seed. Wormwood will stunt the plants growth. Add to food at the last moment, for heat will destroy the flavor.
  • Tender perennial
  • Well-drained soil
Image Soon Fennel, Bronze (Foeniculum vulgare 'Rubrum')

Erect multi-branching stems with bronze fine-feathery foliage, masses of yellow flowers in late summer. Same habits as the green fennel.

  • Culinary:Leaves are used in salads, and stems are eaten fresh like celery. The seeds are popular in baked desserts, such as bread, cookies, and cakes. The entire plant is safe for human consumption.
  • Medicinal: Fennel tea has said to soothe the stomach. Ancient physicians reccomended it for the inrease of mothers milk. Fennel has a huge history in greek and midievil times. Fennel was thought to be one of the 'Nine Sacred Herbs'. Also indicated to reduce the effects of alchohol.
  • Aromatic: The oil extracted from fennel is sweet in aroma. Used in perfumes, liquor, and soap.
  • Ornamental: The bronze colored feathery foliage makes this a very attractive plant.
  • Full Sun
  • 7 feet in height
  • Coriander will stop Fennel from forming seed. Wormwood will stunt the plants growth. Add to food at the last moment, for heat will destroy the flavor.
  • Tender perennial
  • Well-drained soil
Image Soon Feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium)

A relative of the Chrysanthemum. Once popular for many aches and ills in the past, it slowly lost it's importance due to new medicine on the market. Recent studies still prove it to be be more effective than these new remedies.

  • Culinary: Throw a couple of leaves in food to cut the grease.
  • Medicinal: A few leaves a day will decrease the coming of migraines. Also used for a mouthrinse after a tooth extraction, and for a mild laxative.
  • Ornamental: Feverfew is widely used as a low-growing annual in window boxes and rock gardens for its clusters of daisy flowers.
  • Full Sun to partial shade.
  • 2-3 feet in height.
  • Little help needed, seeing this plant grows through cracks in cement.
  • Biennial/Perennial
  • Well-Drained soil.
Image Soon Geranium Scented, Apple (Pelargonium odoratissium)

Scented Geraniums are grown mainly for Aromatic and Ornamental reasons. Not many are edible, and they are not known medicinally. There are historic remedies, but research shows them not to be true.

  • Culinary: Many varieties of Scented Geraniums have few culinary purposes. The foliage is sometimes added to jams and jellies. Also flavors syrups and some fruit drinks.
  • Aromatic: An intense apple fragrance makes this a delightful Geranium. Fresh and dried foliage is used in potpourris. The high oil content is the reason Scented Geraniums have such aromatic popularity.
  • Ornamental: The Apple Geranium is more compact than other vareities. Small velvet leaves, and white flowers make it an attractive looking plant. Great for indoor growing. Foliated stems also make an attractive aromatic garnish.
  • Medicinal: Although not very popular for medicinal uses, there are some uses for the oils they contain. Used in aromatherapy massages, the scents uplift spirits and relax the mind. Also thought to help with headaches.
  • Sun
  • 12-18 inches in height.
  • Protect scented geraniums from extreme colds.
  • Annual
  • Well-Drained soil
Image Soon Geranium Scented, Apricot (Pelargonium scabrum)

Scented Geraniums are grown mainly for Aromatic and Ornamental reasons. Not many are edible, and they are not known medicinally. There are historic remedies, but research shows them not to be true.

  • Culinary: Many varieties of Scented Geraniums have few culinary purposes. The foliage is sometimes added to jams and jellies, and used in baking. Also flavors syrups and some fruit drinks.
  • Aromatic: An distinctive apricot fragrance makes this a delightful Geranium. Fresh and dried foliage is used in potpourris. The high oil content is the reason Scented Geraniums have such aromatic popularity.
  • Ornamental: Pink flowers, and deep green glossy foliage add interest to the Apricot Geranium. Scented geraniums are great indoor growers.
  • Medicinal: Although not very popular for medicinal uses, there are some uses for the oils they contain. Used in aromatherapy massages, the scents uplift spirits and relax the mind. Also thought to help with headaches.
  • Full Sun
  • 24 inches in height
  • Protect from extreme cold. Dry leaves in shade to protect the aroma.
  • Annual
  • Well-Drained soil.
Image Soon Geranium Scented, Capri
Image Soon Geranium Scented, Chocolate (Pelargonium quer 'Chocolate')
Image Soon Geranium Scented, Citronella (Pelargonium 'Citrosa')

Scented Geraniums are grown mainly for Aromatic and Ornamental reasons. Not many are edible, and they are not known medicinally. There are historic remedies, but research shows them not to be true.

  • Culinary: Many varieties of Scented Geraniums have few culinary purposes. The foliage is sometimes added to jams and jellies, and used in baking. Also flavors syrups and some fruit drinks.
  • Aromatic: A strong citrus fragrance makes this a delightful Geranium. Fresh and dried foliage is used in potpourris. The high oil content is the reason Scented Geraniums have such aromatic popularity. Citronella is widely used in mosquito repellant, and candles to help deter the annoying little insect.
  • Ornamental: A rapid grower. Planted ootdoors for the warm seasons in large containers is qiute attractive.
  • Medicinal: Although not very popular for medicinal uses, there are some uses for the oils they contain. Used in aromatherapy massages, the scents uplift spirits and relax the mind. Also thought to help with headaches.
  • Full Sun
  • 24-30 inches in height
  • Helps keep mosquitos and other biting insects away.
  • Annual
  • Well-Drained soil.
Image Soon Geranium Scented, Coconut (Pelargonium grossularioides)

Scented Geraniums are grown mainly for Aromatic and Ornamental reasons. Not many are edible, and they are not known medicinally. There are historic remedies, but research shows them not to be true.

  • Culinary: Many varieties of Scented Geraniums have few culinary purposes. The foliage is sometimes added to jams and jellies, and used in baking. Also flavors syrups and some fruit drinks.
  • Aromatic: A strong Coconut fragrance makes this a delightful Geranium. Fresh and dried foliage is used in potpourris. The high oil content is the reason Scented Geraniums have such aromatic popularity.
  • Ornamental: Nice bright pink flowers and rounded dark foliage make this everblooming geranium very ornamental.
  • Medicinal: Although not very popular for medicinal uses, there are some uses for the oils they contain. Used in aromatherapy massages, the scents uplift spirits and relax the mind. Also thought to help with headaches.
  • Full Sun
  • 24 inches in height
  • 65-70 degrees indoor temperatures.
  • Annual
  • Well-Drained soil
Geranium Scented, Dr. Livingston
Geranium Scented, Fingerbowl Lemon
Geranium Scented, Ginger
Geranium Scented, Gooseberry
Geranium Scented, Lemon (P. crispum minor)
Image Soon Geranium Scented, Lime
Image Soon Geranium Scented, Nutmeg (P. fragrans)
Image Soon Geranium Scented, Orange
Image Soon Geranium Scented, Peppermint (P. tomentosum)
Geranium Scented, Robers Lemon Rose
Image Soon Geranium Scented, Prince Rupert
Image Soon Geranium Scented, Rose (P. graveolens)
Geranium Scented, Rose Variegated
Image Soon Geranium Scented, Skeleton Rose
Geranium Scented, Snowflake
Image Soon Geranium Scented, Strawberry
Image Soon Germander (Teucrium chamaedrys)

Glossy dark green leaves and pink flowers mid to late summer. Often used as a low hedge where Boxwood is not hardy. Foliage is quite similar to tiny Oak leaves.

  • Medicinal: Germander has a long medicinal history. Once used to cure just about anything, the beliefs of this plants abilities are not backed up by scientific research. Used in the past to heal wounds. A cure for asthma, bronchitis, soar throat. Especially popular for the cure of gout, and rheumatism.
  • Aromatic: Foliage gives off a garlic-like aroma. Used in the past for an air-freshener.
  • Ornamental: Still used currently for it's border qualities. Easily cut as a small hedge, and throws up pink flowers from mid to late summer.
  • Full Sun to part shade.
  • 24 inches in height.
  • Divide plants in the fall if so desired.
  • Perennial
  • Well-drained soil.
Image Soon Horehound (Marrubium vulgare)

This plant was quite popular in the past for it's medicinal qualities. Also thought to remove magic spell from those who are cursed. Originally used, and probably best known as a candy flavoring.

  • Culinary: The foliage may be candied, and eaten as treats. It's menthol taste is very striking. Also used in the flavoring for ales, and mostly teas in England.
  • Medicinal: Large doses of the extraction from this plant is used as a laxative. Very popular for it's use as a throat losenge. The menthol taste and aroma clears nasal passages, and soothes throat pains. Widely used in over-the-counter drugs.
  • Full Sun
  • 24-30 inches in height.
  • If not restricted, Horehound may easily take over your garden. Don't let seed spread throughout your garden, for it self sows very easily.
  • Perennial.
  • Well-Drained soil.
Image Soon Hyssop, Anise (Agastache foeniculum)

This herb was widely used by many tribes of Native Americans.

  • Medicinal: Roots are used as an aid in coughs and respiratory problems. Leaves are used for teas.
  • Aromatic: Foliage is dried and used in potpourris.
  • Full Sun
  • 24-36 inches in height.
  • Divide root in the spring.
  • Perennial.
  • Rich, moist soil.
Image Soon Hyssop, Blue (Hyssopus officinalis)

Mentioned in the bible as a cleansing aid, it's name means 'Holy Herb'. Thought of as the cure to lepersy, and could wash the disease away.

  • Culinary: Help digest fatty tissues in meats and fish. Always used in small amounts. Its minty flavor is used in fresh garden and fruit salads.
  • Medicinal: Used in a tea for digestion, and appetite reasons. Also an aid for soar throats. Poultices from this herb are said to cure wounds and bruises.
  • Aromatic: Flowers and leaves are added to potpourri.
  • Ornamental: A popular use in most herb gardens. Flowers are born in late summer, and attract many bees and butterflies.
  • Full sun.
  • 2-4 feet in height.
  • Keep pruned to about 6 inches to promote new, lush growth.
  • Perennial.
  • Light, well-drained soil.
Image Soon Hyssop, Pink (Hyssopus officinalis 'Rosea')

Being a member of the mint family, it's foliage is very aromatic. Square stems are topped by pink flowers from June to August.

  • Culinary: Help digest fatty tissues in meats and fish. Always used in small amounts. Its minty flavor is used in fresh garden and fruit salads.
  • Medicinal: Used in a tea for digestion, and appetite reasons. Also an aid for soar throats. Poultices from this herb are said to cure wounds and bruises.
  • Aromatic: Flowers and leaves are added to potpourri.
  • Ornamental: A popular use in most herb gardens. Flowers are born in late summer, and attract many bees and butterflies.
  • Full sun.
  • 2-4 feet in height.
  • Keep pruned to about 6 inches to promote new, lush growth.
  • Perennial.
  • Light, well-drained soil.
Image Soon Lavender, Dutch (Lavandula angustifolia 'Vera')

A lovely carefree lavender ideal for landscape. Fast growing, hardy, with a soft compact mounded shape. Silver-grey leaves make this plant an eyepleaser, and wins it a place in many gardens.

  • Culinary: Flowers and foliage are used in jams, jellies, and vinegars.
  • Medicinal: Lavender is mostly used for it's oil, if you excuse it's ornamental abilities. The oil has little reaearch done to it, yet it is thought to have many powers.
  • Aromatic: Lavender's scent is almost indescribable. When you smell it in the air, you will know there is a plant near by.
  • Ornamental: The color of the foliage, and the purple spikes it throws up in mid-summer make this a stunning addition for anywhere the eye can see.
  • Full Sun.
  • 18-24 Inches in height.
  • Protect from heavy winds. Flower stalks will easily break.
  • Perennial
  • Light, well-drained soil.
Image Soon Lavender, English (Lavandula angustifolia)

Considered the original of the lavender's. Once to be thought of as a n herb of love. The scent can remind you of other places in which you smelt it before.

  • Culinary: Bitter foliage is used in European cooking. Flowers are added to vinegars, and jams.
  • Medicinal: Headaches may be soothed from a tea. Tea may also help with flatulance, dizziness, and fainting. Oil has been used as a mild pain killer for insect bites and stings.
  • Aromatic: Foliage and flowers are added to potpourri, as well as herb pillows. The scent is remarkeably refreshing.
  • Ornamental: Sprigs are used in wreaths and dried arrangements. purple flowers are quite attractive.
  • Full Sun
  • 18-36 inches in height.
  • Gather flower stems just after flowers open.
  • Perennial
  • Well-Drained sandy loam.
Lavender, Fred Boutin (Lavandula intermedia 'Fred Boutin')
Image Soon Lavender, French (Lavandula dentata)

Fern-like foliage makes this lavender more useful for it's ornamental values. Although not as fragrant as the other lavenders, it still is popular in the world today.

  • Culinary: Flavors sweets, jams and vinegars.
  • Medicinal: Flower sprigs are used as an insect repellant. Antiseptic and mildly sedative. Oil glands cover the foliage.
  • Aromatic:Oil glands release an aromatic smell that is remembered through time.
  • Ornamental: The fern leaf to this lavender is different than that of other lavenders, and increases it's ornamental value in the garden.
  • Full Sun
  • 18-36 inches in height.
  • More of a tender species, therefore, protect from the cold.
  • Tender Perennial.
  • Well-Drained Soil.
Lavender, French Variegated (Lavandula dentata 'Variegata)

The elegance of this herb, is identical to that of the french, but with a creamy variegation to it. Even more increasingly popular to the eye.

  • Culinary:Flavors sweets, jams and vinegars.
  • Medicinal: Flower sprigs are used as an insect repellant. Antiseptic and mildly sedative. Oil glands cover the foliage.
  • Aromatic:Oil glands release an aromatic smell that is remembered through time.
  • Ornamental: The fern leaf to this lavender is different than that of other lavenders, and increases it's ornamental value in the garden. The variegation makes this lavender even more popular in the garden today, just to make up for it's hardiness issue.
  • Full Sun
  • 18-36 inches in height.
  • More of a tender species, therefore, protect from the cold.
  • Tender Perennial.
  • Well-Drained Soil.
Lavender, Goodwin Creek
Lavender, Grosso (Lavandula intermedia 'Grosso')
Image Soon Lavender, Hidcote (Lavandula angustifolia 'Hidcote')

Perennial. Compact plant with dark purple flowers and small silver leaves. Slow growing. Used in sachets, perfumes, cosmetics. One of the most popular varieties for the dark color of its flowers and compact growth.

Image Soon Lavender, Lady (Lavandula angustifolia 'Lady')

First lavender to flower freely in first year from seed. Blueish flowers on top of the compact foliage. Lavender was popular amongst the Roman and Greek cultures. Added to baths, and used in soaps.

  • Culinary:Flowers and foliage are used in jams, jellies, and vinegars.
  • Medicinal: Oil used as migraine relief, either through tea, or as a drop on the temple.
  • Aromatic: Foliage and flowers are added to potpourri, as well as herb pillows. The scent is remarkeably refreshing. Lavender is dried by hanging, and if dried correctly, may hold it's scent for years.
  • Ornamental: One of the compact varieties that can be used as a sweet smelling border plant. line walkways, and enjoy it's beauty for years to come.
  • Full Sun
  • 12 inches in height.
  • Hardy enough to stay in your garden.
  • Perennial
  • Well-Drained soil.
Image Soon Lavender, Munstead (Lavandula angustifolia 'Munstead')

A dwarf lavender, it is grown for it's compact habit, and it's increase in hardiness. Popular as a permanent addition to todays garden.

  • Culinary: flowers are used to create a vinegar. Also used in jams, and jellies. used to add fragrance and bitterness to foods. Use sparingly.
  • Medicinal:Oil is a sedative, pain killer, and antiseptic. Helps with minor pains, such as insect bites or stings, and minor burns.
  • Aromatic: Added to soap for the clean fragrance in which it emits. Add oil to rinse water to add fragrance to your clothes.
  • Ornamental: The comact habit of this plant makes it easier to manage in the garden. Lavender is dried and hung in kitchens for continuous fragrance.
  • Full Sun
  • 12-18 inches in height.
  • Hardy enough to stay in your garden.
  • Pernnial
  • Well-Drained soil.
Lavender, Provence (Lavandula angustifolia 'Provence')
Image Soon Lavender, Sarah (Lavandula angustifolia 'Sarah')
Image Soon Lavender, Spanish (Lavandula stoechas)

Used in the past to scare off witches and disease. Lavender is forever popular for the scent and beauty of the plant and flowers. Adds beauty to a garden, as well as to dried arrangements.

  • Culinary: Use sparingly in some foods to make them fragrant. Bitter taste is used in European cooking. Lavender makes a good vinegar, and flowers may be added to fresh salads.
  • Medicinal: Lavender is used to repel moths from coat rooms. Oil is used in many respects for sickness, or pain.
  • Aromatic: Bundles are added to drawers for fragrance, and added to potpourri.
  • Ornamental: Flowers are crystalized for decoration. Lavender makes a beautiful hedge plant.
  • Full Sun
  • 18-36 inches in height.
  • Protect from cold.
  • Tender Perennial.
  • Well-Drained soil.
Image Soon Lavender, Sweet (Lavandula hetraphyila)

The oil of lavender was highly used in Rome to scent baths. High in fragrance, lavender is used to scent many perfumes, and cosmetic products.

  • Culinary: Small amounts of lavender may be mixed with herbs to add fragrance to stews. Add minute amounts to cooking to increase fragrance for the dish, or for the house as well.
  • Medicinal: Oil used as migraine relief, either through tea, or as a drop on the temple.
  • Aromatic: Used to scent sickrooms, to give them the smell of cleansiness. Also repels insects.
  • Ornamental: Flowers top this plant all summer long.
  • Full Sun
  • 36 inches in height.
  • Protect from the cold.
  • Tender perennial
  • Well-Drained Soil.

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Last Revised - - March 17, 2002